KEIVAN WOVEN ARTS,

Navajo



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Stock No. 16-0908 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1920
Origin : USA
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'0"X4'10"

Stock No. EBD-1026 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1920
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'4"X6'0"

Stock No. EBD-1025 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1940
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
2'11"X4'8"

Stock No. EBD-1022 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1930
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'7"X4'7"

Stock No. EBD-1018 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1930
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'7"X5'6"

Stock No. EBD-1017 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1940
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'4"X4'1"

Stock No. EBD-1016 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1920
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'11"X6'5"

Stock No. EBD-1015 Add to Favorites
Click to enlarged and detailed pictures

Circa : 1920
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'0"X5'4"

Stock No. EBD-1014 Add to Favorites
Click to enlarged and detailed pictures

Circa : 1930
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
3'0"X4'5"

Stock No. EBD-1013 Add to Favorites
Click to enlarged and detailed pictures
Rug SOLD

Circa : 1940
Origin : USA
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Navajo
5'2"X8'0"


Results 1 - 10 of 32   << Start < Previous 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>


In the late 16th Century the Spanish conquered what is now the American Southwest and disrupted the Pueblo Indians living there. The Navajos lived north of the Pueblos in the plains, and the Navajo culture was very similar to that of Plains Indians, who were hunters and raiders.
The Pueblos had been growing cotton and weaving Native American blankets and Native American garments on looms hundreds of years before the Spanish arrived. It is believed the Pueblos learned their weaving skills from the Indians of Mexico and Central America. When they arrived, the Spanish destroyed the Pueblo culture, and most of the Pueblos that were not killed by the Spanish were relocated with the Navajos in the early 1700s.
With their conquest, the Spanish introduced sheep to the Indians of the Southwest. The sheep had long, silky, smooth wool, perfect for weaving. The Pueblos bought sheep and taught the Navajos weaving and blanket making. The earliest examples of Navajo carpets and Navajo blankets are fragments dating from the Massacre of 1805 by Spanish slave traders. The fragments are simple designs in natural sheep tones - white, grey, tan, brown, black, and indigo blue. The dyes for the blue are believed to have been provided by Mexicans traveling from Mexico City.
The oldest Navajo rugs and Navajo blankets on the market today date back to the 1860s. Present day rugs feature the same style, dyes, natural wool, and weaving techniques as vintage Navajo rugs and antique Navajo rugs. The most collectable pieces are the Navajo chiefs' blankets. There were three phases of chief's blankets: pre-1850s, 1850s - 1860s and 1860 - 1868. Thirty years after this last period, the Santa Fe Railroad and trading posts began to sell Navajo carpets and Navajo blankets to people coming west and to clientele in the east. When Navajo rug-making reached its peak in the 1920s, the Navajos were getting dye packs and wool from the east.
The Navajos still make beautiful Navajo rugs and colorful Navajo blankets today featuring beautiful and colorful Navajo rug designs, but not on the same scale as they did hundreds of years ago.

In the late 16th Century the Spanish conquered what is now the American Southwest and disrupted the Pueblo Indians living there. The Navajos lived north of the Pueblos in the plains, and the Navajo culture was very similar to that of Plains Indians, who were hunters and raiders.

The Pueblos had been growing cotton and weaving Native American blankets and Native American garments on looms hundreds of years before the Spanish arrived. It is believed the Pueblos learned their weaving skills from the Indians of Mexico and Central America. When they arrived, the Spanish destroyed the Pueblo culture, and most of the Pueblos that were not killed by the Spanish were relocated with the Navajos in the early 1700s.

With their conquest, the Spanish introduced sheep to the Indians of the Southwest. The sheep had long, silky, smooth wool, perfect for weaving. The Pueblos bought sheep and taught the Navajos weaving and blanket making. The earliest examples of Navajo carpets and Navajo blankets are fragments dating from the Massacre of 1805 by Spanish slave traders. The fragments are simple designs in natural sheep tones - white, grey, tan, brown, black, and indigo blue. The dyes for the blue are believed to have been provided by Mexicans traveling from Mexico City.

The oldest Navajo rugs and Navajo blankets on the market today date back to the 1860s. Present day rugs feature the same style, dyes, natural wool, and weaving techniques as vintage Navajo rugs and antique Navajo rugs. The most collectable pieces are the Navajo chiefs' blankets. There were three phases of chief's blankets: pre-1850s, 1850s - 1860s and 1860 - 1868. Thirty years after this last period, the Santa Fe Railroad and trading posts began to sell Navajo carpets and Navajo blankets to people coming west and to clientele in the east. When Navajo rug-making reached its peak in the 1920s, the Navajos were getting dye packs and wool from the east.

The Navajos still make beautiful Navajo rugs and colorful Navajo blankets today featuring vibrant Navajo rug designs, but not on the same scale as they did hundreds of years ago.