KEIVAN WOVEN ARTS,

Caucasian & Collectible



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Stock No. 16-1113 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kazak
3'9"X10'1"

Stock No. 16-1204 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1880
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Flat Weave
Type : Soumak
10'10"X16'6"

Stock No. 16-0912 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kuba
3'5"X5'7"

Stock No. 16-0922 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1900
Origin : Caucasus
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Caucasian
3'10"X4'5"

Stock No. 16-0905 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : All Over
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Shirvan
3'8"X4'9"

Stock No. ZBH-15052 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1880
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kazak - Poligoni
5'4"X7'5"

Stock No. 16-0603 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kazak
3'6"X9'9"

Stock No. 16-0602 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kazak
3'7"X9'7"

Stock No. 16-0601 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1890
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Kazak - Karachopf
6'1"X7'0"

Stock No. L11-1205 Add to Favorites
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Circa : 1900
Origin : Caucasus
Design : Medallion
Material : Wool
Texture : Pile
Type : Caucasian
3'6"X16'0"


Results 1 - 10 of 79   << Start < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next > End >>


Antique Caucasian rugs were woven in the mountainous Caucasus region, with the Caspian Sea to its east, the Black Sea to its west, and Iran and Turkey in the south. Little is known about the pastoral nomads and settled tribes of this remote land and the splendid woven arts they produced before the area became part of the USSR. In terms of construction, Caucasian rug weaving falls into two distinct groups.
The Kazak group lies south of the Caucasus Mountains, from Armenia and Azerbaijan, separated by Little Caucasus Mountains. This group is the largest producer of antique caucasian rugs and vintage caucasian rugs in the region, and one of the most desirable. The other weaving areas in the southern Grand Caucasus Mountains include Moghan, Talish, Gendje, Karabagh, Brdjalou, Karachov, and Lori-Pombak, to name a few.
North and east of the Grand Caucasus Mountains lies the Kuba group. The weaving areas in this region include Kuba, Baku, Daghestan, Karagashli, Perepedil, Seichour, Chichi, Shirvan, and Marsali. This region produces the most Caucasian prayer rugs.
Though Caucasian rugs did not gain popularity before the 1970s, vintage Caucasian rugs have become the choice for rug connoisseurs and collectors. Vintage Caucasian carpets were widely marketed in Italy from the 1980s on. Italians appreciate the simple and crude style of the Caucasian rugs and also the tribal significance they portray. They also cherish the rugs because of their size, which are well adapted to Italian room sizes.
All antique Caucasian rugs are made with Ghiordes, or Turkish knots. The colors of the older Caucasian carpets are made from natural materials found in their respective regions. Older Caucasian rugs were mostly made with wool and warp threads. Even goat hairs were used. They had varied colors, which ranged from red/brown to blue to white. Caucasian rug patterns and caucasian rug symbols range from geometric shapes to medallions.
Turkoman rugs can be attributed to Turkoman tribes, which are believed to have originated in the remote steppes of Asia over two thousand years ago. According to the legends, Noah's great-grandson, Oguz, had six sons. The descendants of Oguz form the twenty-four clans of Turkoman tribes, including Tekke, Salor, Ersari, Yomut and Saryk. Other names associated with Turkoman rugs are Bokhara, Beshir, Pendje and Chodor.
Turkoman tribes have settled in East Turkestan, overrunning the boundaries of Persia, Afghanistan, Caucasus and Turkey. This is particularly true of Turkey, as these Turkoman tribes settled there in considerable numbers from the 11th to 13th Centuries, integrating into the population.
Turkoman rug patterns have had a great influence on Anatolian carpet designs, and the most symbolic Turkoman motifs are known as Guls.

Antique Caucasian rugs were woven in the mountainous Caucasus region, with the Caspian Sea to its east, the Black Sea to its west, and Iran and Turkey in the south. Little is known about the pastoral nomads and settled tribes of this remote land and the splendid woven arts they produced before the area became part of the USSR. In terms of construction, Caucasian rug weaving falls into two distinct groups.

The Kazak group lies south of the Caucasus Mountains, from Armenia and Azerbaijan, separated by Little Caucasus Mountains. This group is the largest producer of antique caucasian rugs and vintage caucasian rugs in the region, and one of the most desirable. The other weaving areas in the southern Grand Caucasus Mountains include Moghan, Talish, Gendje, Karabagh, Brdjalou, Karachov, and Lori-Pombak, to name a few.

North and east of the Grand Caucasus Mountains lies the Kuba group. The weaving areas in this region include Kuba, Baku, Daghestan, Karagashli, Perepedil, Seichour, Chichi, Shirvan, and Marsali. This region produces the most Caucasian prayer rugs.

Though Caucasian rugs did not gain popularity before the 1970s, vintage Caucasian rugs have become the choice for rug connoisseurs and collectors. Vintage Caucasian carpets were widely marketed in Italy from the 1980s on. Italians appreciate the simple and crude style of the Caucasian rugs and also the tribal significance they portray. They also cherish the rugs because of their size, which are well adapted to Italian room sizes.

All antique Caucasian rugs are made with Ghiordes, or Turkish knots. The colors of the older Caucasian carpets are made from natural materials found in their respective regions. Older Caucasian rugs were mostly made with wool and warp threads. Even goat hairs were used. They had varied colors, which ranged from red/brown to blue to white. Caucasian rug patterns and caucasian rug symbols range from geometric shapes to medallions.

Turkoman rugs can be attributed to Turkoman tribes, which are believed to have originated in the remote steppes of Asia over two thousand years ago. According to the legends, Noah's great-grandson, Oguz, had six sons. The descendants of Oguz form the twenty-four clans of Turkoman tribes, including Tekke, Salor, Ersari, Yomut and Saryk. Other names associated with Turkoman rugs are Bokhara, Beshir, Pendje and Chodor.

Turkoman tribes have settled in East Turkestan, overrunning the boundaries of Persia, Afghanistan, Caucasus and Turkey. This is particularly true of Turkey, as these Turkoman tribes settled there in considerable numbers from the 11th to 13th Centuries, integrating into the population.

Turkoman rug patterns have had a great influence on Anatolian carpet designs, and the most symbolic Turkoman motifs are known as Guls.