KEIVAN WOVEN ARTS,

Chinese & Art Deco



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Following the western Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD), the techniques of carpet-making spread across China and along the Silk Road. The traditional Chinese rug is said to have originated in northwestern China around the Xinjiang area. Rug-making later made its way to Beijing, formerly Peking. Although the art of Chinese rug-weaving reached its peak between the 16th and 18th Centuries, it was not until the mid-19th Century that China began exporting rugs to the West. The Chinese textile industry is rich in history. Most Chinese carpets were made in specific regions, and scholars attribute the age of a rug to the ruling emperor of the time. Traditional Chinese knotted rugs were made from wool. Early weavers found that silk produced different shades of colors as light sources changed. The designs of antique Chinese rugs were developed by weavers who followed Buddhist and Taoist teachings and they integrated Buddhist and Taoist symbols and art forms into their designs. The complex and geometric designs of the Chinese rugs were simple but had well-balanced symmetry and local physiognomies. Popular designs include the lotus flower, clouds, mythical animals, trees, birds, and Chinese symbols. The designs of these Chinese carpets are largely symbolic, rather than decorative, and the colors are elegant and emblematic. Chinese Art Deco rugs were produced from the 1910s to the 1950s. In the early 20th Century, Walter Nichols was one of the most flamboyant American rug producers in Tientsin, China. Nichols had over 15 factories across China and his rugs were made of wool and silk with bold, robust, and energetic colors. Patterns of these vintage Chinese Art Deco carpets included pictorial scenes, trees, birds, clouds, mountains, dragons, and striking flowers. Nichols cannot be credited with creating Chinese Art Deco rugs, but he did a great deal to popularize Chinese Art Deco rugs and preserve a high standard of rug making. With Nichols's help, Chinese Art Deco carpets began to feature more vibrant colors, different from the two-color rugs produced before Nichols.

Following the western Han Dynasty (206 BC – 24 AD), the techniques of carpet-making spread across China and along the Silk Road. The traditional Chinese rug is said to have originated in northwestern China around the Xinjiang area. Rug-making later made its way to Beijing, formerly Peking. Although the art of Chinese rug-weaving reached its peak between the 16th and 18th Centuries, it was not until the mid-19th Century that China began exporting rugs to the West. The Chinese textile industry is rich in history. Most Chinese carpets were made in specific regions, and scholars attribute the age of a rug to the ruling emperor of the time.

Traditional Chinese knotted rugs were made from wool. Early weavers found that silk produced different shades of colors as light sources changed. The designs of antique Chinese rugs were developed by weavers who followed Buddhist and Taoist teachings and they integrated Buddhist and Taoist symbols and art forms into their designs. The complex and geometric designs of the Chinese rugs were simple but had well-balanced symmetry and local physiognomies. Popular designs include the lotus flower, clouds, mythical animals, trees, birds, and Chinese symbols. The designs of these Chinese carpets are largely symbolic, rather than decorative, and the colors are elegant and emblematic.

Chinese Art Deco rugs were produced from the 1910s to the 1950s. In the early 20th Century, Walter Nichols was one of the most flamboyant American rug producers in Tientsin, China. Nichols had over 15 factories across China and his rugs were made of wool and silk with bold, robust, and energetic colors. Patterns of these vintage Chinese Art Deco carpets included pictorial scenes, trees, birds, clouds, mountains, dragons, and striking flowers. Nichols cannot be credited with creating Chinese Art Deco rugs, but he did a great deal to popularize Chinese Art Deco rugs and preserve a high standard of rug making. With Nichols's help, Chinese Art Deco carpets began to feature more vibrant colors, different from the two-color rugs produced before Nichols.